Spanish

Why I Want To Be a Layer

Personal ment What do you want to do when you grow up It is the requisite question any adult asks every child. As a youngster the answer waseasy. I want to be an archaeologist, proud of myself for being able to spell a word that some of my teachers could not. This idea lasted through elementary school, until I learned of some disturbing news. Eventually, someone let slip that the true job of an archaeologist does not involve carrying a bullwhip, booby trapped cursed artifacts, or fighting Nazis. My curious young mind drew a blank. I no longer knew what to be. I no longer had a clear goal of what it was I did want to do.
At this point, when asked the same question, my new response of I don’t know, was always met with a reluctant suggestion that I should not be in a hurry, that perhaps one of these days I would find something, that there would always be time. One notable suggestion for a vocation I ever received was that maybe I should consider being a lawyer. That suggestion was quickly shot down. Lawyer No thanks. Like many of my law school applying peers, my first impression of a lawyer was from TV and movies. Unlike my peers, I was neither fascinated by the ramblings of Matlock nor of someone’s cousin named Vinnie. No thank you. And so I would wait.
Flash forward twenty years, and the answer was, unfortunately, still the same. I did not rush into any decision. I took my time. But approaching age thirty, I was becoming frustrated with my lack of direction. Perhaps it was genetics. My mother found her vocation at age forty. Raising three children on her own was tough enough. While working two jobs, and going to night classes, she finally became an elementary school teacher. a job she still loves. Although I truly admire my mother’s fortitude, I was too impatient to wait that long.
I did not have a specific focus when I went through high school, except for knowing then that I wanted to go to college – a good college. My goal for those four years of high school was clear. Good grades and SAT scores got me into my top choice of UCLA, but once there, I was again lost. Scandinavian languages Anthropology I could not even select a major. I eventually chose political science because I enjoyed many of the classes. I wondered if that was the right choice, as it surrounded me with pre-lawyers, a role I was not dreaming of.
I was still taking my time. I was still not in a hurry. In the meantime, I worked various jobs, hoping to stumble upon my dream job. I found them all interesting, in the beginning. With a lot to learn, I was stimulated so I advanced quickly. Later on, as there was less to learn, I realized that I wanted more. Would I ever find a job compelling enough to keep me interested and learning It was not looking good.
The real highlights came in the periods between jobs, when I could set off for parts abroad. These stints gave me the opportunity to live somewhere new and learn something new. The variety and challenges of different cultures and languages provided the stimulation I wanted. Working for a summer in Ireland, learning Spanish in Guatemala, and studying Vikings in Copenhagen all worked towards the idea that wherever I do end up, ‘international’ would likely be in my job title.
Last spring, I came across a notice for an internship in Germany. I spoke no German, but read on. The legal research internship provides an opportunity for a student who is keen on international environment law with fluency in English and Spanish. International environmental law There it was again. Everywhere I turned it was law, or lawyer or law school. Could I escape it Should I escape it I read the ad again, picturing myself as the prospective intern. I have always been a proponent of a healthy environment. Time in Germany would be great. I could read Spanish and English. But most likely it was the word international that convinced me to apply. And so I applied. I felt that I was destined for this and so I got it.
Had I made the wrong decision I walked up the steps to what I hoped was the right address. It was not bad enough that I was unsure about my choice to take on this work, but I was not even sure if I was in the right place. I was very confident when emailing my resume and cover sheet, and later on a telephone interview. But now I was here, second-guessing butterflies did their dance. Take a deep breath. I did know why I came. I did know I could do the work. So let’s get started.
At last, I was in the right place. As soon as I understood my duties, I dove into the work. It primarily consisted of reading and reviewing different articles on environmental impact assessment from Chile and the European Community, then preparing summaries. Varied. Challenging. Detailed. For me, invigorating. So this is what a lawyer does It was nothing like those dull court room so-called dramas. I knew immediately that I had to learn what this job was really all about.
Challenged as I was with the job, it empowered me to make a vital decision – I wanted to be a lawyer. I realized that my calling is truly to be of service to people by upholding the truth and the majesty of the law.
Realizing the immensity of the commitment in becoming a lawyer, I further evaluated if this indeed is my destiny or just another one of my passing whims. Researching the rigors of studying in a law school, talking with law school students and lawyers, as well as touching base with my mentor Dr Hannes Wakonig only served to strengthen my resolve.
Now, I am all geared up to take bold steps towards my dream. The only part I find distracting now is the waiting. I will have to wait until next fall before my I can officially get started with the next and most exciting chapter of my life. I was not in a hurry. I took my time. It paid off.
What do you want to do when you grow up they will ask.
And with confidence, I will reply, I want to go to law school!

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