History

Week 3 Reflection paper

Topic: The Cell, Organism and Technology There are many versions to the origin of life for all living things but the more comprehensive and agreeable is a hint at the idea that the cell is the basic component of living organisms as well as being the fundamental unit of life. Cells not only make up living things but are living things themselves. The cell contains specific vital components that enhance cell processes. They include the nucleus, mitochondria, and ribosomes among others. It is through the cell processes that living organisms accomplish their activities. The cell being the basic unit of life is responsible for life continuity through reproduction. The origin of multi-cellular organisms is from colonies of single-cell protists. Despite this emphasis of the autonomy of cells, Haeckel a scientist did note that their independence becomes controlled by the bonds of the community as the division of labor
The cell was also seen as the essential element of pathological processes according to the illustrated theories. Diseases came to be considered (irrespective of the causative agent) as an alteration of cells in the organism. Andrew a researcher emphasized the primacy of cells for comprehending pathological and normal form and function in the human body. This would therefore draw conclusion that remedies or solutions to pathological ailments must be cell centered if success is to be achieved. In coming up with treatments for pathological ailments, the cell is primary to getting the remedy in relation to compatibility of the remedy produced ensuring that there is life and continuity is not hampered with.
Organelles perform a specific function in the cells to enhance cell processes. This enables the function of living things made up of various cells with differentiated functions.
With all the theories trying to explain the origin of life, there is however, a missing link between these theories that prevents an even more general and unifying concept of life.
References
Andrew Reynolds. Ernst Haeckel and The Theory Of The Cell State: Remarks On The History Of A Bio-Political Metaphor. Hist. Sci., Xlvi (2008)

Back To Top