Chemistry

The Problem of a Role of Transnational Companies in the North Africa

The modern world is the world of changes. It is characterized by a range of influential trends. One of such trends is the growing role of multinational companies not only in the business world but in the whole society. Transnational companies have an influence equal to the influence of some countries. That is why it is important to study their role and predict possible future. It is going to be the main task of this research paper. The big attention is going to be paid to national economies and place of TNCs in the countries of North Africa.
To begin with, it would be reasonable to provide background information about the region under consideration. North Africa is the widest part of the mainland. This region of Africa includes the following countries: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia, and Western Sahara. Canary Islands, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Madeira are also sometimes referred to North Africa.
North Africa is the most developed among African countries. The most developed are the following countries: Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Morocco, and Algeria. This region has a favorable economic and geographical position, situated at the crossroads of three continents – Europe, Asia, and Africa. Trade has always played an important role, especially after the construction of the Suez Canal. Then the region gained important military-strategic importance.
Countries in the region are heterogeneous in terms of economic development. Basis countries are members of OPEC, where GDP per capita is 17-20 thousand dollars. The region is rich in minerals (phosphates, chromite, bauxite, zinc), but the main resource is energy – oil and natural gas.
Profits from the sale of oil – "petrodollars" in recent decades have been invested in the economy. According to experts, this figure reaches more than a trillion dollars. Most of them went to the creation of new industries in these countries: automotive, petroleum, chemistry, organic synthesis, basic chemistry, light industry, and others.&nbsp.

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