Statistics

The Issues of Ethics Character Leadership and Service

It is very frustrating. The amount of good, middle-class paying jobs have significantly been reduced, and quite a number of jobs that are boosting employment statistics include many unskilled or low-skill jobs such as jobs at McDonald’s (the fast-food chain), and other such forms of employment. This was just some background to demonstrate what is happening in our economy. Basically the rich are getting richer—remember the tax cuts for the top 3 or 4 percent of the wealthiest people in the U.S. who own a majority of the nation’s wealth? And obviously, the poor are getting poorer. One in seven Americans is living below the poverty line. Now, for someone to have to live below the federal poverty line, basically you have to make a certain lesser amount than what would generally be considered middle-class. Many college students have had to go back to live with their parents—in some cases, even after they have gone to grad school and maybe have gotten married…with children. Thirty million Americans are currently on some form of government TANF aid like food stamps.

When the food runs out, what will people do? They might riot. Cities could become desolate, Chicago could become Detroit…it is all a domino effect just waiting to happen. The cities would become breeding grounds for violence. Basically, the fact that the average American worker has little or no say in his or her paycheck, or interest in his or her work, is severely limiting the potential of what this nation could truly do—if the Administration puts people to work, for example, in a Great Depression era-style public works program like the WPA, employing people from all walks of life. Something must be done now, as in—immediately! People need jobs and the fact that there are gaps in some peoples’ resumes are now grounds for discriminating against hiring people. Peoples’ work histories do not fit neatly into bubbles. Many people go through periods in their lives where they were perhaps living at home with their parents, and were perhaps going to school and were not employed—even if it’s just for one summer.

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