Information

Technology in Health Care Information Systems

In many hospitals around the nation, nurses and other healthcare providers have begun using laptops as a means to input key data with reference to the progression and care of patients within the hospital setting. however, this practice is something that has not been expanded to use by the doctors and nurses within the clinical field. Whereas it may be common to notice a nurse or other healthcare provider within the hospital transcribing notes onto a mobile workstation, finding a similar practice employed within the doctor’s office is almost unheard of. A key drawback to not accepting this level of technological change within both the hospital and the doctor’s office itself is the fact that a key and important level of inference and electronic cross reference is missed out upon. As medical technology continues to grow and the role of health privacy continues to be defined, a key concern with respect to patient rights is ensuring that any and all of the information systems that are provided within the field of medicine are as impervious as possible to the threat of security breaches (Sharma 2012). Although it is, of course, impossible to guarantee that any system will be impervious to the threat of hackers and others who are bent on obtaining illegal access to sensitive patient information, it is still nonetheless incumbent upon the healthcare providers and shareholders to ensure that the systems which they adopt, utilize, and increasingly make interconnected must place a very high level of emphasis on patient privacy.

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