Political

Representation of Slavery Fort McHenry and Hampton

While the Hampton is a representative place of life during the eighteenth and nineteenth century in Maryland, Fort McHenry was a representation of the heroic fight for the civil and political challenges. Fort McHenry represented the place that battled the British and gave to the country the stars and stripes anthem. Baltimore was not a major fighting point during the civil war but played a strategic role because of its position. All troops and movement of men and material need to flow through Maryland to reach the war fronts of the south. Fort McHenry was the prison for the supporters of the secession during this period. However, Fort McHenry played a significant role during the fight with the British in 1812. There is also evidence of Afro-American descendants fighting for America. Fort McHenry and Hampton are about 10 miles from one another. The visit to Hampton which is off the northbound Dulaney Valley Road and into the Hampton lane for about a mile down is interest kindling and relates the social history and life of the people during that period. Whereas, Fort McHenry relates us to the times of war and power play that makes to the history books. While one is a symbol of life, the other is a symbol of victory over aggression and the victory of equality of human beings.Private William Williams was the first black to get into the exclusive only white US Army in 1812. Fort McHenry represents the day of equality for the first time in the history of the US. A runaway slave was made a private and was paid the regular private bounty of $50 along with private wages of $8 per month. The equality that this action represents in the history of America actually marks the beginning of America, less than fifty years of declared independence of America. The subjugation of weaker men in the earlier world was common. Slaves are found all over the world from Africa to America. from the east to the west.

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