Art

Outcast Theme in American Literature

The leader was well aware of how much supportive press leaders who were behind him, such as John F. Kennedy, has gotten for their political support of arts, as well as how much goodwill the support of arts has generated home and internationally (Mihalache 34). He anticipated that through establishing a federal art agency that he might gunner more endorsement from the East Coast liberal development, which opposed most of his policies. The endorsement of arts is what constituted to the American outcast. Americas, prior to the arts act, were not always kind to the artists or people who basically opted to pull out of the traditional way of life so as to arrive at some knowledge and some individual integrity. The scientists, on the other hand, always seemed to receive all the praise whereas arts and humanities received mostly negatively reviews (Mihalache 34). The American outcast theme is also portrayed infamous American literature such as Rye, Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, Scarlet Letter, Star Wars and Finding Nemo (Mihalache 35). All these works have the major theme of the main protagonist breaking away from the traditional way of life to living by trying to fulfil way the society has set for them but instead fulfil what they have set for themselves. Historically, the outcast arose from the mystique concerning frontier life (Mihalache 35). The Frontier Life, also referred to as the Turner Thesis, was an argument developed by historian Frederick Turner back in 1893, which held that American democracy was developed by the country’s frontier. As the 1774 to 1778 Governor of Virginia argued, Americans, at all times, think of a land that is far off even though they seem content with the one that they are already settled. The governor went on to say that if Americans attained paradise, they would still move on with the slightest chance of being promised an advanced place (Mihalache 35).

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