Science

Islamic ceramics

This is in part has been attributed to the influence of science and technology in ceramics and pottery traditions which coincided with the scientific renaissance of the 10th and 11th centuries (Fehervari, 2000). The innovation of the period mark not only the development of the craft but give insights to how cultural and scientific development impact society together.Islamic ceramics and pottery have been traced to the 8th century, developing in key Middle Eastern civilization centers such as Iraq, Persia and Syria. Excavation indicated that most artifacts from the period were mainly utilitarian and had only used basic glazing methods. However, by the late 8th and the early 9th century, the glazing became a common practice and there was significantly increase in artistic competencies which included the introduction of lusterware production. Excavations in Basra, Damascus and Fustat show intricate ceramic painted walls using blue as a predominant color, a traditional that will eventually be a characteristic of Islamic ceramics and pottery.According to Lane (1947), the Abbasid dynasty, early supporters of Mohammed and Islam, utilized ceramics and pottery as a means to promote their political power as well as the religion, which became the foundation of the concept of an Islamic tradition of pottery. The period also provides documentation on the trade with China which is major influence to artisans. Aside from trade, there was also an exchange in technology and styles which reached a high during the Seljuk dynasty with the arrival of the Mongol invasion but which subsequently declined with the decline of the Mongol Empire. This level of interaction would only be augmented once more in the 15th century peaking during the Tang dynasty (Meri amp. Bacharach, 2005. Fehervari, 2000).One of the key features of Islamic ceramics and pottery is in the use of glazes which allowed artisans to create an opaque, metallic-like finish to

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