Programming

International Relations Structures of International Governance

Global governance seeks the change in the politics and administrative terms, however, the paradigm is deeply embedded in the traditional intergovernmental framework. They see global governance as a form of supranational organization in which governments “sacrifice their authority to a higher supranational authority” (Sandler, 1997). Using this approach, global governance is viewed primarily in terms of a trade-off between national sovereignty and supranational authority which is obviously too simple.
In addition to this, people started adopting the fact that the governments cannot be the sole agency to governance due to their incomplete capabilities and outright partiality on some issues (Vayrynen, 2003). Thus the importance of NGOs was recognized by the Commission on Global Governance, but their dual nature was also not ignored. It was noted that the growing range of actors involved will challenge the governance by making it more complex, and the diversity may complicate the process as well. However, it was also kept in mind that this will greatly increase the capacity of NGOs and put them more in power as compared to the previous years (The governance system the Commission on Global Governance, 1995).

Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs): They are the legally constituted independent, nonprofit, private organizations with humanitarian goals, which may be transnational, local, or national and have unstructured or formal management. A broader definition includes nonprofit entities or private organizations that are not affiliated with national or local government participation or representation, and receive fundings such as foundations, academic institutions, firms, and cooperative development organizations. The nongovernmental organizations are essential to humanitarian relief in bringing years of experience in public health and preventive medicine programming to a crisis zone (Lawry, 2009).

Back To Top