Political

International Law and National Security

Argument: Realism is the most useful theory when dealing with cases of international security: The case of nuclear proliferation in AsiaArgument: Realism is the most useful theory when dealing with cases of international security: The case of nuclear proliferation in Asia&nbsp. Realism is predominantly the most useful theory, especially when dealing with cases of international security. Realism also called the complex independence, is enacted in regions where aggression by extremists is inevitable especially when nuclear issues are involved. Some of such cases include France selling the reprocessing plant to Pakistan or the event of nuclear proliferation in Asia (Inavov, 2011, p.32). Some other cases require policy reforms as was the case of plutonium reprocessing in the U.S where the common idea was assimilated across groups that believed plutonium was the key to a sustainable future. The action bred transnational alliances among different departments in the U.S against the mainstream political fabric. The state of affairs did not conform to the theory of pure realist model (Lessaffer, 2012, p.27).

Case Study of Realism Policy in AsiaCan realism policy replace complex dependency approach? A complex dependency model has a different approach: the emphasis is focused on different players and not necessarily between states, giving priority to various issues depending on the complexity and use of force is also eliminated. Force is used as an instrument of achieving peace. The theory does not apply in a complex dependency model where transnational characters move across borders and form coalitions that do not have a national definition (Hassler, 2013, p.37). Realist policy proves useful when dealing with policy issues in Asia due to the massive power balance set by the Chinese economic powerhouse and the other two dominant economic powerhouses in Asia: America and Japan. The theory affirms that it is better to be part of the two powers than have the one: equilibrium had to be attained by preventing coalitions between two nations that would sideline the remaining economic powerhouse (Ryngaert, 2008, p.16). America had to avoid being played off against Japan by China.

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