Sociology

Intergrating Case Management

Harris Kamran Health Sciences Nursing 19 July Challenges of Integrating Case Management The practice of nursing has greatly evolved over the years, and today it involves much more than just managing patients inside a walled environment (Cohen Toni, 2005). Today, the concept of integration of case, care and disease management has received much attention, and this integrated approach has found its way beyond walls (Cohen Toni, 2005), and expended to patient care and management in the different sectors, such as acute care, ambulatory care, care at home and work, care in rural areas (Scott, 2000), on-the-go or mobile care, and even the access to this sector through the Internet and local web set ups (Carver, 2001) to provide management online to people who cannot be physically accessed. These developments mean that the nursing staff can no longer rely on just the medical training to perform well in the field, but rather have to be trained extensively in management, sociology, Information Technology, and even basic courses of economics to understand the implications of the patients’ social and economic status, limitations, and boundaries. This is especially true of nurses that would be working across the border in foreign territories (Kim, Woith, Otten, McElmurry, 2006). for them, a basic training in the culture, history, and traditions of that place is paramount for a successful relationship with their patients and other health officials of that country (Kim et al., 2006). As a result, it is recommended that such interdisciplinary training and courses should be incorporated in the curriculum of the nursing schools so that the students acquire these additional required skills for their profession along with the technical knowledge (Kim et al., 2006). It is evident that this profession has become increasingly competent and academically demanding, and so the selection of the candidates for the nursing schools should be made more regulated and stringent by keeping the changing requirements and the globally (Kim et al., 2006) evolving nursing environment in view. References Carver, T. (2001). Alternative case management. Nursing Management, 32(8), 33. Cohen, Elaine Liebman, Toni G. Cesta. (2005). Nursing case management: From essentials to advanced practice applications.U.S.A.: Elsevier Health Sciences. Kim, Mi Ja, Wendy Woith, Karine Otten, and Beverly J. McElmurry. (2006). Global nurse leaders: lessons from the sages. Advances in Nursing Science, 29 (1), 27-42. Scott, J. (2000). A nursing leadership challenge: Managing the chronically ill in rural settings. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 24(3), 21.

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