Law

Importance of the EU Citizenship Law

The idea of European Union citizenship was brought into force for the first time by the Maastricht Treaty, with the subsequent Treaty of Amsterdam extended the implementation of its provisions (Baliga, 1994). Before EU member countries had reached a consensus on the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, various treaties of the European Communities supported the free citizenship and residency for only the economically viable individuals. The Treaty of Paris, established in 1951 brought into force the European Coal and Steel Community. The resulting situation provided room for free movement for employees in these sectors across the EU countries. The Treaty of Rome (1957) guaranteed workers across EU countries, free movement for purposes of service delivery (Marian, 2012).
The European Court of Justice has, of late, construed the provisions of the Treaty European Court of Justice as having broader social and economic implications in the international forum as opposed to the perceived narrow impact (Baliga, 1994). The Court has established that the liberty to fill employment positions was imperative, not just as a way to create a common market for the advantage of the economic growth of the member states, but as an avenue for raising the economic wellbeing of the workers, hence the quasi-economic policy (Marian, 2012).
Shuibhne (2010) noted that the ECJ’s verdicts have been leaning toward advancing economic issues as opposed to free citizenship. For example, the Court says workers’ rights to free movement within the EU apply irrespective of their role in filling employment positions in foreign countries. Moreover, both temporary and permanent workers are cushioned from expulsion, whether or not the affected party needed extra financial help from the host country (Baliga, 1994).&nbsp.

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