Studies

Hair by Malcolm X

Of course, we understand the pain that he had to go through in the process of this scientific procedure as his friend had warned him beforehand. The writer says that in retrospect it was a humbling experience because he had sacrificed his individuality and originality to change his hairstyle and straighten it so that it looked like a white man’s. Yet Malcolm was pleased to have pulled off this experiment at the time and it undoubtedly contributed to his fame as ‘Big Red’ as well. In ‘It Can’t Be Helped’, Jeanne W. Houston and her husband James Houston write about the uprooting and relocation of the Japanese in America in the wake of the bombing on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. President Roosevelt had signed Executive Order 9066 giving the War Department authority in the western states to relocate anyone who posed a possible threat to US interests to be interned to secure locations- Japanese Americans were not surprisingly among the most likely suspects. Jeanne clearly recalls the times in which their father had disappeared and now they were suddenly being told to relocate to Terminal Island. The entire episode is explained through the eyes of a child (Jeanne was 7 at the time) and is a mixture of amusement and pity as she writes that she thought she has been sold to a Chinaman. her feelings and that of her family as they are being uprooted and her mother’s breaking of the china tea set rather than have it sold well below its worth as they were forced to leave their house in a hurry. Her family later found that her father had been imprisoned in North Dakota at a male camp for enemy aliens. Jeanne’s account is quite subjective (Houston, 2003, 359). 2. Writers sometimes try to persuade us to agree with their points of view. Choose two writers from Collection 7, and list at least two views or opinions of each writer. In Stephen King’s ‘Now you take Bambi or Snow White- That’s Scary’ he is of the opinion that parents should make their own choices as to the suitability of their kids viewing a scary movie such as his own ‘Carrie’ or ‘Salem’s Lot’. He has shown ‘Salem’s Lot’ to his kids with no adverse effects, it is hoped. Yet he is amused when sex and violence is condoned in cartoons and fairy tales such as Bambi (whose mother is killed) and Hansel and Gretel where (in a modernistic twist of the tale) he assumes that both children are left in the woods by their father due to bad economic circumstances and that they arrive upon the abode of a witch with cannibalistic tendencies (King, 2003, 482). On the other hand, the Courts have admitted as evidence studies that suggest that exposure to violence on television rubs off on children who either become desensitized to violence or are forever in tension fearing that they might be the next victims. In ‘The Man in the Water’ Roger Rosenblatt writes of an account of heroism and selflessness displayed by an unnamed man on a flight that clipped a bridge while landing near the Potomac River in Washington D.C in extremely cold weather in 1982. This man decided to take charge of the situation and help other people out of the plane and onto the safety of other rescuers who had put out ropes and other equipment to help people before the emergency services could arrive.

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