Technology

Environment Business Analysis of Kenya

Aswathappa (2008) states that globalization has hit the world markets like a storm with an increased flow of goods and services from one country to another with relatively less ease. Within the same period, there has been a notable increase in market interpenetration which has increasingly made it impossible for countries to avoid external impacts on their economies. Technology has been one of the most significant factors that have helped facilitate the rapid growth in international trade. These interrelationships that countries have adopted have on the other hand made countries vulnerable to global economic trends be they beneficial or detrimental. Those involved in international business have been forced to embrace the uniqueness that lies within individual countries’ markets and cope with the challenges faced as a result while trying to capitalize on the benefits that these markets offer.&nbsp.

Kenya is an East African country that borders Uganda, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, and the Indian Ocean. Kenya has a population of almost 40 million people making it a potential market for goods and services (World Bank, 2010). Kenya’s capacity in tourism and agriculture surpasses other sectors in revenue generation but the economy is fundamentally agricultural dealing mainly with crops like tea and coffee as well as horticultural produce. The country had been regarded as relatively stable politically since its independence in 1963 as compared with its immediate neighbors. According to Yabs (2007), the country has had its share of unfortunate times in its political history with first surviving an attempted coup in 1982, instability brought by the emergence of multiparty democracy in the early 1990s and the 2007 post-election violence. Some of the notable highs include the peaceful transition of power from the 24 years service of former President Daniel Moi to current president Mwai Kibaki in December 2002.

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