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Effects of Fats and Cholesterol on Cardiovascular Disease

Cardiovascular disease, abbreviated as CVD, is known to be the leading cause of death in the world today (Gaziano, Reddy, Paccaud, Horton, Chaturvedi, 2006). Cardiovascular diseases include many kinds of diseases that mainly consist of the heart, brain, arteries, and other essential organs.Cardiovascular diseases were not very common back in the start of the 20th century. They accounted for lower than 10% of the deaths in the world. This figure, however, was increased to 30% by 2001, 80% of which included deaths in countries with low-income levels. Moreover, it was predicted that by 2020, deaths due to CVD will account for the biggest chunk globally (Gaziano, Reddy, Paccaud, Horton, Chaturvedi, 2006). Since the 1950s, CVD had been the most major cause of death in the developed world, and it was quickly replicated in the developing countries by 2001. In statistical terms, this accumulates to around 50% of deaths in the countries with high income and 28% of deaths in the countries with middle or low levels of income. Currently, however, deaths due to other reasons such as injuries, respiratory diseases and HIV/AIDS play the most significant role in causing death in many parts of the world. But even in those parts, CVD is now evolving to be a significant threat. (Gaziano, Reddy, Paccaud, Horton, Chaturvedi, 2006)The biggest contributor to deaths in the CVD department, in the developed countries as well as the developing countries, is the Ischemic Heart Disease, abbreviated as IHD. The two main appearances of IHD are in the form of acute myocardial infarction and angina. Myocardial infarction is when the blood supply to the heart muscle is obstructed, resulting in the damaging of heart tissue. And angina is the severe chest pain experienced due to lack of oxygen supply to the heart. In 2001, alone, 7.3 million deaths were caused by IHD. (Gaziano, Reddy, Paccaud, Horton, Chaturvedi, 2006).

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