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Comparison between Electoral Systems and Movement Organising

Comparison between Electoral Systems and Movement Organising Democracy is a process by which people have a right to choose the leaders theydesire, and can therefore hold these chosen leaders accountable for the rules imposed on them and the acts conducted in these leaders’ offices. An electoral process is when a group of people in the society come into an agreement to choose specific individuals who occupy a representative office for all. A movement organising is an organisation that uses the power of collectiveness to bring change in region or nation.
Question 1
John Avalos has made several appeals to the people of San Francisco. Among his promises, the most appealing ones include the promise to create thousands of jobs in San Francisco within the standard wage rate. to provide full funding to students in public schools and efforts to realise the achievement of acceptable worldwide healthcare. These three look appealing because they directly concern the common San Franciscan in a daily basis. The ideas of John Avalos are greatly realistic because he states that he previously closed a total of $1 billion in a timeframe of two years when he was the chairperson of the Board of Supervisors. The closed deficit amount was used to create several jobs. John Avalos has also worked in association with Bayview people to reduce incidences of police bullying, and this indicates that he is capable of implementing the security issues in his appeal agenda. Big businesses can not contribute to the realisation of Avalos’ ideas because he has led a protest against them, especially big banks who lend loans to San Franciscans at higher rates (Avalos, 2011).
Question 2
Using people’s power has positive aspects such as the appeal of having the masses in support of the change they need. When the masses are in solidarity in demanding for a particular action from the government, there is much more international attention focussed on the situation that forces the concerned parties in authority to take appropriate actions to correct the situation. Moreover, when the people act in solidarity to demand change, they have much more strength and motivation to see it done (Organising for Power, Organising for Change, 2015). The negative aspects of peoples’ power are that it can lead to violence resulting in injuries or even loss of lives. In some cases, it leads to a prolonged instability in the region or country affected. An example of the case where the peoples’ power took control was in the Arab revolution in Egypt when the Egyptians rose against the then regime of President Hosni Mubarak. The Egyptian protests mainly concerned political issues and legal issues that they claimed to treat them poorly. After they had succeeded to over through President Hosni, there were political reforms, even though instability remains a big challenge to date.
Question 3
The number of registered voters who vote usually reduces under any normal circumstance. Movement building can be used to improve on the voter turnout more conveniently than the electoral system. Usually when the masses participate in demonstrations such as the peoples’ power, the struggling communities take a large part in the participation. The reason as to why they are more likely to participate is because they are the least advantaged in the society and are therefore the ones who demand better conditions than the well-off communities. The struggling communities pay very less attention to the electoral systems than mass movements since they think the mass movements are more direct and give them a forum to air their grievances. Mass action can, therefore, be used as a tool to increase the voter turnout, since it attracts more attention of people than the electoral systems.
References
Avalos, J. (2011, November 05). John Avalos for Mayor: Everyday Giants can turn the city around. Retrieved November 09, 2015, from San Francisco BayView: http://sfbayview.com/2011/11/john-avalos-for-mayor-everyday-giants-can-turn-the-city-around/
Organising for Power, Organising for Change. (2015, November 09). People Power. Retrieved November 09, 2015, from Organising for Power, Organising for Change: http://organizingforpower.org/people-power-2/

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