Chemistry

Clinical Chemistry Study

The only conclusive tests recommended for establishing whether a person is infected with Hepatitis A virus is by obtaining a blood sample and then conducting serological tests on the blood sample. The tests include looking for Immunoglobulin M antibody to Hepatitis A virus and Immunoglobulin G antibody for Hepatitis A virus (Palmer, 2004).
The laboratory investigations revealed that the levels of urea, creatinine, bilirubin AST and Alk. Phos., above the reference range implying that the patient general had a disease of the liver. Urea and creatinine are usually used to test for liver diseases and higher levels are indicators of renal failure. Bilirubin is usually an indicator of pre-hepatic or posts hepatic block depending on the rations while AST and Alk. Phos., are indicators of damage to the biliary tree (Basten, 2010).
Biochemical investigations of the liver primarily involve finding out the level of biomolecules found in the liver and the exact position of these biomolecules. Since studies have been able to establish the normal ranges for these biomolecules any ranges outside the normal or when particular biomolecules are found at suspicious sites, then these could indicate liver disease (Sheety, 2009).
Urine tests aids in the monitoring of the functioning of the liver and establishing whether the liver is diseased or not. Urine tests also target biomolecules that would otherwise not be found in urine or measures the levels of normal biomolecules found in the urine. An example is the compound Delta Aminolevulinic Acid that is produced from amino acids in the liver. Reduction in the levels of the compound might indicate chronic liver disease. In essence, urine tests target such compounds to establish the condition of the liver at a given time (Schiff, 2011).

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