Psychology

Changing Staff and Managerial Roles in the 21st Century

This paper identifies the contemporary role of various hospitality roles, examining how these responsibilities have transformed and suggest future trends that will likely drive further role evolution.Far from the previous role of simply ensuring quality food preparation, today’s chef role in the hospitality industry requires extensive knowledge of human resources principles, as well as coordinating efforts to enforce various, contemporary legislation regarding food safety such as the HACCP – Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (Taylor Forte, 2008) – and manage internal inventories. Chefs must not only consider elements of food presentation and overall food quality, in today’s busy hospitality industry the role of chef requires an understanding of staff psychology (in terms of coordinating a functional kitchen environment). Depending on the nature of the hospitality firm in which they are employed, modern chefs might well be called upon to interact with various restaurant clientele as a means of promoting positive customer service and relationship-building. From this perspective, customer service entails discussing food variety with inquisitive clients whilst promoting an image of competence and projecting a professional image that is in line with strategic industry objectives. In essence, the role of the chef has moved from one in which food preparation was hidden deep within the recesses of the backroom kitchen and has extended to that of a leader and a much more visible element of the entire hospitality process.As little as 10 years ago, very few chefs maintained computers in their work environments (Martin, 2003: E16). In today’s Westernised cultures (such as the UK and the United States), changes in computer technology allow chefs to manage inventory electronically, develop an appropriate hotel and restaurant menus as well as staff scheduling and labor.

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