Political

Assassinations to Sustain Governments

Assassinations to Sustain Governments The goal of the purge in 1938 was to eliminate the enemies of Stalin and to establish a solid soviet society. In a sensational series of trials, the potential enemies of Stalin and the exponents of Bolshevik party were executed. Stalin’s proceedings to his opponents were treacherous, for his flair for manipulating situation is evident from the execution of seventeen Ukraine soviet ministers. Stalin’s efforts were to grab and consolidate his own power ruthlessly suppressing whoever came his way. If the purge would not have taken place, his government could not have come into power. So, Stalin was evidently using all the harassments against his rivals to sustain his government that otherwise would have lost the public support.
2. Sergei Kirov was one of Stalins closest supporters on the Politburo and was in 1934, the party boss of Leningrad. At the 1934 Party Congress, Kirov changed side and began criticizing Stalin and his cruel policies. Fearless ones agreed with Kirov while other less daring ones stayed silent. Stalins position in the Central Committee was under doubt as Kirov pocketed highest number of votes while Stalin got zero. So, Stalin decided to take action against Kirov, the emerging rival for leadership in the Party. On 1st December 1934, Stalin had Kirov assassinated. On the same day, Stalin passed a law that ordered anyone accused of terrorism and plots against the government was to be arrested and executed immediately after conviction (Furia 8 – 9).
3. Stalin feared if Sergei Kirov would grab power from him. So, he tried to persuade Kirov to be loyal to him. Stalin asked Kirov to leave Leningrad to join him in Moscow. Stalin wanted Kirov in a place where he could keep a close eye on him. When Kirov refused, Stalin decided to have him assassinated (Furia 8 – 9).
4. Kirov was a potential rival in the party against Stalin. He used to disagree with Stalin over the issue of democracy within the party. Stalin feared if Sergei Kirov would topple him down from power. So, he tried to persuade Kirov to be loyal to him. Stalin asked Kirov to leave Leningrad to join him in Moscow. Stalin wanted Kirov in a place where he could keep a close eye on him. When Kirov refused, Stalin decided to have him assassinated. He was shot dead on December 1st 1934 by a party member called Leonid Nikolayev (Furia 8 – 9).
5. The assassination of Kirov turned out as expected by Stalin. Whatever Stalins specific role in the assassination of his political rival Kirov, he used the murder as an alleged reason for eliminating many of his rivals in the Communist Party, the government, the armed forces and the intelligentsia. Kirovs assassination provided as the basis for seven separate trials and the arrest and execution of hundreds of notable figures in Soviet political, military, and cultural life.
6. The assassination of Kirov can never be regarded as worthwhile. For, it paved the way for blood baths in Russia. Stalin was taking this as an opportunity for eliminating his rivals in the party. Moreover, communist party lost a prospective leader who would have contributed towards the general good unlike the dictator Stalin.
Works Cited
Furia, Diana L. “Interpretations and explanations of the great purges in the Soviet Union, 1936-1938.” California State University Dominguez Hills. ProQuest Information and Learning Company. (Spring 2004): 1-51.

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