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s of Affiliation Allen, K. L., Gibson, L. Y., McLean, N. J., Davis, E. A., amp. Byrne, S. M. . Maternal and family factors and child eating pathology: risk and protective relationships. Journal of Eating Disorders, 2 (11), 1-14. DOI:10.1186/2050-2974-2-11Summary of the Article and Research Findings of the AbstractThe article is about the association linking maternal, family aspects, and child eating conditions. According to Allen, Gibson, McLean, Davis, and Byrne (2014), it remains inconclusive whether family aspects can precisely foretell the signs of an eating disorder or correlate to an overall child psychopathology of which the signs of an eating disorder may be a factor. In their study, Allen, Gibson, McLean, Davis, and Byrne (2014), wanted to establish the ancestry and maternal aspects that may foretell increases or decreases in the signs of a child eating disorder over a duration. The Allen, Gibson, McLean, Davis, and Byrne (2014), study had 221 participants, mother-child dyads. The study participants were evaluated at baselines. 1-year and 2-years sequel. The investigators used linear mixed models and other methods to find the forecasters of the signs of child eating disorder. The findings of the study showed that the youngsters of mothers with a preceding or current eating condition registered considerably higher levels of worldwide indicators of eating conditions as well as emotional food intake, compared to children of other mothers. Moreover, mothers with a preceding or current eating condition were more concerned of their children weight. Family susceptibility to constant worry/stress and little motherly education were additional risk considerations for eating disorder indicators. Allen, Gibson, McLean, Davis, and Byrne (2014), concluded that a mother’s concern of a child’s weight, stress in the family, the mother’s education level, and a child’s level of family gratification could foretell the signs of eating disorder in a child. Reasons for Choosing the ArticleThe article is informative and fills the gap in research that family aspects can precisely foretell the signs of an eating disorder in a child. Moreover, the article addresses a relevant issue in our society, childhood obesity. Drobnjak, S., Atsiz, S., Ditzen, B., Tuschen-Caffier, B., amp. Ehlert, U. (2014). Restrained eating and self-esteem in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Journal of Eating Disorders, 2 (23), 1-10. DOI:10.1186/s40337-014-0023-1Summary of the Article and Research Findings of the AbstractDrobnjak, Atsiz, Ditzen, Tuschen-Caffier, and Ehlert (2014) did the research because of the lack of information about disordered food consumption in middle-aged females. Therefore, in their study, the researchers aimed to examine the eating behavior, focusing on menopause as an accompanying aspect in restrained food intake. Drobnjak, Atsiz, Ditzen, Tuschen-Caffier, and Ehlert (2014) wanted to understand in what way(s) the postmenopausal condition and self-image interacted to influence food intake patterns among females in their middle ages.Drobnjak, Atsiz, Ditzen, Tuschen-Caffier, and Ehlert (2014) used an online survey approach that involved women aged 40-66. The researchers used the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) to evaluate the eating habit in pre and post-menopausal females (N=318 and N=250 respectively). The researchers used the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE) to rate the self-image of the participating women. According to the research findings, 15.7% all the study participants indicated clinically significant scores on restrained food intake. Additionally, according to the EDE-Q scale, postmenopausal women indicated meaningfully higher scores of restrained food intake as contrasted with the premenopausal females. Further, the scores were insignificant when the researchers controlled for the BMI of the women. In addition, high and low self-image levels were linked to restrained food intake.Drobnjak, Atsiz, Ditzen, Tuschen-Caffier, and Ehlert (2014) concluded that restrained food intake might occur in middle-aged females, especially in postmenopausal females. Furthermore, restrained food intake may be linked with higher and lower self-image.Reasons for Choosing the ArticleI choose this article because it addresses a research gap that had been ignored for a long time, as most researchers concentrated on restrained food intake among children and teens. In addition, the topic is relevant in the modern society.

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